Infection, Immunology & Translational Medicine (IITM) Oxford

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2015

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Hannah Behrens

Hannah Behrens

I completed my Bachelors degree in Biochemistry and Cell Biology at Jacobs University Bremen (Germany). Before joining IITM I completed short term projects with Kerstin Kutsche on the genetics of human Ras-opathies, with Matthias Ullrich on levan synthesis in Pseudomonas syringae, with Victor Torres on pore forming toxins of Staphyloccocus aureus, and with Monika Hagedorn on the non-lytic egress of Mycobacterium from the surrogate macrophages Dictyostelium discoideum. In the IITM program I rotated with Keith Gull, to create stable fluorescent trypanosome cell lines for microscopic screening studies, with Colin Kleanthous investigating the protein antibiotic pyocin S5, and with Helen McShane evaluating T- and B-cell subpopulations in tuberculosis positive or negative HIV patients. Currently I work in Colin Kleanthous’ lab investigating the receptor binding, import and immunity mechanism of pyocin S5, a protein antibiotic killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Besides lab work I enjoy playing volleyball, dancing, painting and writing for the university’s newspaper.


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Marianne Clemence

Marianne Clemence

I am using genomics and molecular biology to research the Neisseria polysaccharide capsule, under the supervision of Martin Maiden. I first worked with Martin on a bioinformatics project investigating the gonococcal genetic island, as part of my Biological Sciences degree at Oxford. I gained more experience on the SUR Programme, University of Lausanne, working on the molecular biology of a Candida glabrata adhesin with Dominique Sanglard. After graduating with a departmental prize, and a passion for infectious disease biology, my first IITM rotation took me to Christoph Tang’s group, investigating outer membrane vesicles in Neisseria cinerea. Following a macrophage project with Irina Udalova, I returned to Martin to work with the model species Neisseria musculi, in collaboration with Magdalene So, University of Arizona, before starting my PhD project in October 2016. I have also developed an enthusiasm for public engagement, as a STEM Ambassador and contributor to Bang! Science Magazine.


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Cherrelle Dacon

Cherrelle Dacon

I obtained a BSc Biochemistry and PG Dip in HIV Infection Management at the University of the West Indies. My DPhil project aims to shed light on the mechanisms by which HIV-1 infection of macrophages perturbs homeostasis and contributes to their role in global immune activation and the pathogenesis of HIV-associated inflammatory disease. I’m supervised by Prof. Quentin Sattentau, Dr. Rebecca Russell & Dr. Kenny Moore (Sir William Dunn School of Pathology). As a Rhodes Scholar (Commonwealth Caribbean and St. Edmund Hall, 2015) and member of the Rhodes Biomedical Association, I volunteer to coordinate public engagement activities such as the annual Rhodes Healthcare Forum. At Teddy Hall, I manage events to promote diversity awareness. After my DPhil, I hope to engage in work that focusses on translating clinical research findings into changes to health policy and practice. Rotations: 1 – Prof. Philip Goulder 2 – Prof. David Greaves 3 – Dr. Jeremy Day


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Lucy Garner

Lucy Garner

Before joining the IITM programme, I worked in Oxford as a Research Assistant in Richard Cornall’s group, where I contributed to diverse projects relating to B cell development and function.  My IITM rotations were with Paul Klenerman, Fiona Powrie, and Graham Ogg.  I have a long-standing interest in the biology of unconventional T cells and their role in disease, which I had the opportunity to explore further during my rotations.  This led to my DPhil project in the Klenerman group, where I am investigating the regulation and function of mucosal-associated invariant T cells and how these may be altered in inflammatory settings, for example inflammatory bowel disease.  Outside the lab, I regularly participate in public engagement events, including teaching at science clubs for local children as a STEM Ambassador, and organising pub science talks through Pint of Science and the British Science Association SciBar events.


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Layal Liverpool

Layal Liverpool

I am fascinated by viruses because they are relatively simple and yet cause such devastating diseases. Currently based in Jan Rehwinkel’s lab at the WIMM, my DPhil research is focused on understanding how invading viruses are detected and dealt with by the innate immune system. I graduated with a BSc Immunology & Infection from UCL in 2015. At UCL I worked in Greg Towers’ lab investigating HIV pathogenesis. During my rotations in Oxford I worked at the interface of virology and immunology in the labs of Quentin Sattentau, Jan Rehwinkel and Michael Dustin. I am a passionate science communicator. My short talks about HIV and flu landed me in the regional final of the science communication competition Famelab in 2016. As a STEM ambassador at Science Oxford, I volunteer with children at science-themed clubs. I also regularly write science articles targeted at non-expert adults and run a science-themed Twitter account.


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Richard Morter

Richard Morter

I am interested in the immunology of infectious diseases and tropical medicine. I undertook my BSc at The University of Manchester and undertook a placement year at the Medical Research Council Unit, The Gambia. Last year, I completed rotation projects in the labs of Adrian Hill and Richard Cornall in Oxford and Philip Bejon in Kilifi, Kenya. I am now undertaking my DPhil project between the Jenner Institute, Oxford and the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Unit, Kenya where I am looking at the role of Regulatory T cells in immunity to malaria and how they might suppress the performance of malaria vaccines in endemic countries. I am using samples from human malaria challenge studies, clinical vaccine trials and paediatric cohorts to functionally investigate the heterologous effects of Tregs in malaria.

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