Infection, Immunology & Translational Medicine (IITM) Oxford

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2016

 

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Iva Atanaskovic

Iva Atanaskovic

I am a first year student at the Department of Biochemistry in the Kleanthous Lab. I am co-supervised by Professor Martin Maiden, because my project will combine methods of biochemistry and bioinformatics. I am working on pyocins – protein antibiotics that target specific strains of a bacterium called Pseduomonas aeruginosa. The goal of my project is to find novel ways of linking pyocins and their receptors in the bacterial outer membrane. Before coming to Oxford, I was studying molecular biology at the University of Belgrade in Serbia. I have done various internships in the field of bacteriology. Back in Serbia I used to work as a teaching assistant at the Petnica Science Centre for high-school students. I was also a member of the Parisian iGEM team that won the World Jamboree in 2013. In the first year I did rotations in the Kleanthous Laboratory (Department of Biochemistry), in the Maiden Laboratory (Department of Zoology) and in the Klenerman Laboratory (Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research). All my rotations were oriented towards Gram-negative bacteria, whilst asking different questions and using diverse methods and approaches. Besides being a bit obsessed with bugs, I also enjoy drawing and sewing (ivaankaa.deviantart.com; @ivaaa_nkaaa | Instagram).


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Juliane Brun

Juliane Brun

Hello, I am Juli and I am from Germany. I started this programme last year and I am still in the rotation phase. For my bachelors degree I studied Molecular and Technical Medicine and worked with adenoviruses and stem cells. Afterwards I started my masters in Molecular Medicine, with a specialization in Infection and Immunology. After studying in Germany, I decided to go abroad. I secured an internship in Cambridge (4 months) where I worked on Herpesviruses. I then went to Stockholm (Karolinksa Institute, 8 months) for my masters thesis, where I worked with Semliki-Forest virus. In the past I have really focused on virology, which I want to continue here in Oxford. I really enjoy this programme, which provides three different possibilities of finding a project. Aside from work, I love travelling and discovering different countries and cultures. 1. Rotation: Ervin Fodor 2. Rotation: Christian Eggeling.


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Johannes Pettmann

Johannes Pettmann

After my undergrad in Germany, a year in the U.S. and my Master’s degree from Oxford I decided to stay in Oxford for my DPhil. In my first rotation, I worked on a mucosal immunity mouse model at the lab of Kevin Maloy. Next, I joined Simon Davis’s lab, investigating the interaction between two T cell signalling proteins. Since I really liked this topic, I asked for another immunity rotation, joining the lab of Omer Dushek. In his lab, I learnt mathematical modelling of T cell signalling. I enjoyed all three labs, but I knew T cell signalling is what I would like to do research about. Since Simon Davis and Omer Dushek already collaborate, I proposed a joined project with both supervisors. The research will be about the interface between T cells and APCs. In particular, the dynamics of small structures called close contacts, used by the T cell to probe for antigen.

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Felix Richter

Felix Richter

I graduated in 2014 from a German-French Bachelor’s program in Molecular Biology held by the University of Strasbourg (FRA) and the Saarland University (GER). During this time, I developed a profound interest in immunology and decided to enroll in the Global Master’s program in “Biomedicine” at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. I used this opportunity to extend my knowledge in translational approaches of research and aimed to bring science to the general public in the context of the student competition iGEM and the RNA Club Stockholm. Since I joined the University of Oxford, I thrive to investigate questions surrounding the immune system and neighboring tissues during chronic inflammation. During my rotations, I had the chance to work with Prof. Kay Grünewald setting up protocols to visualise HSV-1 entry machinery using cyroEM. For my second rotation, I joined Prof. Katja Simon and was involved in a project investigating the effects of autophagy on metabolism and granulopoiesis. In my last rotation, I worked with Prof. Alison Simmons to explore new avenues of innate antiviral immunity. Since then I joined Prof. Simon for my PhD project looking at the role of autophagy and the interplay of bone marrow niche and hematopoietic system.

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Robert Ragotte

Robert Ragotte

I completed my undergraduate degree in microbiology and immunology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. At UBC, I worked under the supervision of Dr. Stuart Turvey at the BC Children’s Hospital studying primary immune deficiencies and immune dysregulatory diseases. For my PhD, I am working with Prof. Simon Draper to understand how we can use the adeno-associated virus gene therapy platform to deliver monoclonal antibodies (vectored immunoprophylaxis). After finishing my PhD, I plan to complete clinical training in Canada before embarking on a career as a clinician-scientist. My lab rotations were with Prof. Matthew Higgins (Biochemistry), Prof. Simon Draper (Jenner Institute) and Prof. Stephen Baker (OUCRU). When not in the lab, you can find me climbing mountains, running through Port Meadow or playing boggle at the pub.


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Alun Vaughan-Jackson

Alun Vaughan-Jackson

Before coming to Oxford I completed my undergraduate studies in Infection and Immunology at UCL where I worked in Prof. Greg Towers lab researching HIV-1 host-pathogen interactions post-viral entry. Prior to this I have also done a summer internship on Salmonella in the Holden Lab at Imperial College London. My interests lie primarily in the interactions between pathogens (viruses) and the innate immune response, or rather – how pathogens circumnavigate this. This has led me to undertake my PhD project in Prof. William James’ lab where I will combine advances in CRISPR and stem cell technology to investigate the role of the Cyclophilin family of proteins in innate immunity. I have also set up a collaboration with my old lab at UCL to investigate further into their roles in HIV using a drugs based approach. My rotations were in the labs of William James, Fiona Powrie, and Ellie Barnes. Outside of the lab I enjoy committing to the college side of Oxford life, taking on social secretary responsibilities in Keble College.

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